1850.] AMERICAN N0 TE-BOOKS. 385

healthier men therefor. They appear to be busy men, these stablers, yet have a lounging way with them, as if indolence were somehow diffused through their natures. The apparent head of the establishment is a sensible, thoughtful - looking, large - featured, and homely man, past the middle age, clad rather shabbily in gray, stooping somewhat, and without any smart- ness about him. There is a groom, who seems to be a very comfortable kind of personage, a man of forty- five or thereabouts (R. W. Emerson says he was one of his schoolmates), but not looking so old ; corpulent, not to say fat, with a white frock, which his goodly bulk almost fills, enveloping him from neck nearly to ankles. On his head he wears a cloth cap of a jockey shape ; his pantaloons are turned up an inch or two at bottom, and he wears brogans on his feet. His hair, as may be seen when he takes 0E his cap to wipe his brow, is black and in perfect preservation, with not exactly a curl, yet a vivacious and elastic kind of twist in it. His face is fresh-colored, comfortable, sufli- ciently vivid in expression, not at all dimmed by his fleshly exuberance, because the man possesses vigor enough to carry it off. His bodily health seems per- feet; so, indeed, does his moral and intellectual. He is very active and assiduous in his duties, currycomb- ing and rubbing down the horses with alacrity and skill; and, when not otherwise occupied, you may see him talking jovially with chance acquaintances, or ob- serving what is going forward in the street. If a female acquaintance happens to pass, he touches his jockey cap, and bows, accomplishing this courtesy with a certain smartness that proves him a man of the world. Whether it be his greater readiness to talk,

or the wisdom of what he says, he seems usually to be von. 1x. 25