34 BARKER’S L UOK.

taste the dregs of his humiliation, but it must be done. He ran up the staircase and knocked timidly at the sitting-room door. There was a momentary pause, and a weak voice said Come in.” Barker opened the door; saw the vision of a handkerchief thrown away, of a pair of tearful eyes that suddenly changed to stony indifference, and a graceful but stiffening figure. But he was past all insult now.

I would not intrude,” he said simply, but I came only to see your father. I have made an awful blunder more than a blun- der, I think-a fimtcl. Believing that I was rich, I purchased your fatheris claim for my partners, and gave him my promissory note. I came here to give him back his claim for that note can never be paid I I have just been to the bank; I find I have made a stupid mistake in the name of the shares upon which I based my belief in my Wealth. The ones I own are worthless—— I am as poor as ever I am even poorer, for I owe your father money I can never pay l”

To his amazement he saw a look of pain and scorn come into her troubled eyes which he had never seen before. This is a feeble trick,” she said bitterly; “it is unlike you -- it is unworthy of you l