Home Made Visible collection

Azada Rahi 1/1 A
A video clip recordings from 1995 consisting of children and teenagers from the Raptors Junior Dance Pak rehearsing a dance routine at the SkyDome. Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Around 1994, 9-year old Azada Rahi living in a nearby co-op auditioned at the Cabbagetown Youth Centre to be part of the junior Toronto Raptors Dance Pak. The choreographer was Clarence Ford, who auditioned kids, teens and young adults from all over the city, and ran the Pak once the crew was established. He was a delight to work with, was extremely kind, and was great at keeping so many young people organised and focused. Here, November 2nd, 1995, at the SkyDome (presently the Rogers Centre) the Pak rehearses the same routine over and over in preparation for the opening performance at the first-ever Toronto Raptors game. On the day of the performance, Azada recalls pushing through the stomach flu to perform, her hard work could not go to waste, and it was a very exciting time. They had already performed at the Toronto Raptors opening dinner gala the previous summer. The Junior Dance Pak continued to dance at games and other functions for some time, though Azada only stayed with them for about a year and a half to two years. [...] For Azada, the years she spent in the Pak, encountering Canadian athletes and entertainers were “fun and weird”. These tapes are the sole recordings of her dancing that she has had access to. Looking back at the footage proved surprising, hilarious, and a chance to reflect on herself as an uninhibited young dancer.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Azada Rahi 1/1 B
A video clip recording from 1996 consisting of children and teenagers from the Raptors Junior Dance Pak dancing on stage behind Six Nations country singer Rebecca Miller singing and introducing the YTV Achievement Award recipients. Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Around 1994, 9-year old Azada Rahi living in a nearby co-op auditioned at the Cabbagetown Youth Centre to be part of the junior Toronto Raptors Dance Pak. The choreographer was Clarence Ford, who auditioned kids, teens and young adults from all over the city, and ran the Pak once the crew was established. He was a delight to work with, was extremely kind, and was great at keeping so many young people organized and focused. [...] In 1996 the Pak was hired to perform at the YTV Achievement Awards. Dawning matching plaid and denim ensembles, the Pak backup danced for Indigenous Canadian country singer, Rebecca Miller. This country line-dancing number was one of three performances they did at the Awards that evening, including one with Aashna Patel. For Azada, the years she spent in the Pak, encountering Canadian athletes and entertainers were “fun and weird”. These tapes are the sole recordings of her dancing that she has had access to. Looking back at the footage proved surprising, hilarious, and a chance to reflect on herself as an uninhibited young dancer.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Azada Rahi 1/1 C
A video clip recordings from 1996 consisting of children and teenagers from the Raptors Junior Dance Pak line dancing on stage behind Six Nations country singer Rebecca Miller singing "Listen to the Radio" at the YTV Achievement Award recipients. Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Around 1994, 9-year old Azada Rahi living in a nearby co-op auditioned at the Cabbagetown Youth Centre to be part of the junior Toronto Raptors Dance Pak. The choreographer was Clarence Ford, who auditioned kids, teens and young adults from all over the city, and ran the Pak once the crew was established. He was a delight to work with, was extremely kind, and was great at keeping so many young people organized and focused. [...] In 1996 the Pak was hired to perform at the YTV Achievement Awards. Dawning matching plaid and denim ensembles, the Pak backup danced for Indigenous Canadian country singer, Rebecca Miller. This country line-dancing number was one of three performances they did at the Awards that evening, including one with Aashna Patel. For Azada, the years she spent in the Pak, encountering Canadian athletes and entertainers were “fun and weird”. These tapes are the sole recordings of her dancing that she has had access to. Looking back at the footage proved surprising, hilarious, and a chance to reflect on herself as an uninhibited young dancer.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Leah Burke 1/3 [ : England]
"Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "'The year is 1990, and the Burke Family is on vacation in Bristol, England. This is filmed where Leah’s father, Sam grew up. All of Leah’s aunts and uncles had houses in the same neighbourhood, and this is a family reunion of sorts. Here, Leah, age eight or nine, dances to ska and lovers rock with her mother, Rita and Great Aunt Sweeney, while her dad is seen off in the background, and her older brother, Jason, films. Her dad has roots in Jamaica and her mother has roots in Guyana. At different points in their lives both immigrated to England, and later met each other there. Her parents then set off to Canada during the Pierre Trudeau years in 1972 to raise a family. The Burkes now call many places home.'", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Leah Burke 2/3 [ : sunrise]
Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "'This is Friday, Dec 25th, 1992,' Leah’s dad, Sam, begins the voice-over in this clip made in the Burke’s family home in Peterborough, ON. Her father describes the beautiful sunrise that clear Christmas morning. It contrasts the weather from just a week prior when there was a record breaking 70 cm of snow, which was the worst snowfall in the province in 90 years. This filming style and voice-over in the Burke’s home movies was characteristic of her father, Leah says, 'He wouldn’t wait for anybody, he would just start filming.'"
Leah Burke 3/3 [ : Christmas]
Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s Christmas, 1992, and within the short span of this clip the presence of almost Leah Burke’s whole family is felt. From her dad offscreen singing along to gospel (Mahalia Jackson’s ‘Go Tell It On the Mountain), to her brother, the then sullen teenager, seen cooking pancakes for family breakfast, to finally Leah, who weaves through the house filming. She reveals herself as the documentarian in a mirror reflection waving ‘Hi’. In present day, Leah recalls, ‘This is a typical Burke house family moment’.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Shenaz Baksh family [ : Liberty Village]
Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "Liberty Village in 2005 was a rapidly changing place, and Shenaz Baksh, equipped with a brand new Super 8 camera decided to document it. The community had changed so much and by the brief shots of construction seen outside her office window, would only continue to change more. This gave Shenaz all the more reason to archive her workplace of five years. Nearing 15 years later, Shenaz’s coworkers marvelled less at how spaces change over time, like Shenaz had intentioned, but more at their youthful appearances.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Shenaz Baksh family [ : Mahaica Market, Guyana]
Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "As a child, Shenaz wandered Mahaica Market with her mother shopping for the weeks groceries. As an adult and as a filmmaker, Shenaz wanted to capture her childhood memories and archive the vendors in the market. For Shenaz, recording her trip back to her childhood community had less to do with being Guyanese and more to do with being a filmmaker and an artist.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Shenaz Baksh family [Guyana: Mahacia 2004, Toronto: Mom + Work 2003]
Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "In 2008, Shenaz sets up her Super 8 camera to test it out on the trip from Scarborough to North York and back again. The footage moves at double time, in a time lapse, due to the short filming capacity of Super 8 cameras. Her aunt accompanies her on the first leg of the trip, her expression almost static in the bright winter sunshine. As her aunt exits the car at her destination, Shenaz sets up the camera on the dashboard to face her for a moment, slipping on her sunglasses. The camera is later refocused on her father in the passenger seat, as she drives him to his chemotherapy session. For the last portion of the road trip, Shenaz turns the camera onto the road itself, finally parking in front of her home where she began.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Trinh Nha Truong 6 2 of 3
A video clip recording from 1992 consisting of a Khmer-Krom family celebrating a birthday. Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "The Truong/Tram family’s home movie footage shot in VHS format on January 25th 1992, captures the 1-month old birthday party of their youngest son in Brantford, ON, shortly after moving from Hull, Quebec. A full and lively gathering, their celebration includes families chatting over a community meal, speeches, gift giving, dancing to 80’s music, and loving footage of a peaceful baby enjoying the party. The Truongs/Trams are of Khmer-Krom ethnicity, translating to 'Khmer of the South'. The Khmer-Krom are an [unrecognised] Indigenous group and ethnic minority in the South of Vietnam. Many Khmer people who inhabited the same refugee camps in Vietnam later immigrated together to Canada. When the Truongs/Trams arrived in Hull, Quebec (now Gatineau, Quebec) in 1989, they were able to regularly connect with a Khmer community at gatherings like these. The Troung/Tram family have since relocated to Toronto ON where they continue to celebrate and take pride in their identity, and attend Khmer language and dance classes. The Khmer Buddhist Temple of Ontario in Hamilton remains central to them and their community. Mother, Trinh Nha Truong, was happy to share her footage with Home Made Visible because she wants to show other Canadians that ‘our people live in Canada too.’", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Valcin family [ : Montreal 1971 snow storm]
Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "On March 4th, 1971, Montreal saw the “Storm of the Century”, a massive snowstorm brought 43cm of snow and 100/km winds to the city. It would take 41 years for this snowfall record to be broken. People lost electricity for as long as ten days. Nadine recalls living on St. Leonard and not being able to see through her patio doors and that the only people who could get around were emergency vehicles and snowmobiles. Of course this major setback meant snow days for everyone, and Nadine’s parents and neighbours got to shoveling. In a predominantly italian neighbourhood, Nadine suspects her family may have been the only Black family on this street. With no school, five-year old Nadine took pleasure in the Montreal pastime of building snow forts.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program.
Valcin family [ : NYC 1969]
Project and donor(s) contributed description follows: "It’s November 1969 in New York City and the Valcin Family is celebrating Nadine’s dad birthday. Four year old Nadine waves at the camera and helps blow out her father’s candles. We see Nadine’s mother cutting the cake. Later in the day, Nadine, drinking her juice from a cocktail glass, is engrossed in a serious conversation with her father. Her mom, a filmmaker in her own right, is behind the camera shooting on Super 8mm film. Months later the camera is pulled out again to document Christmas, a very exciting time for Nadine was an only child. Her brother and sister, not yet born, were fascinated to see these images of their eldest sister as a child. This private but celebratory occasion is one the whole family dresses up for. Nadine dons an all white pantsuit she later swaps for something more comfortable, while her parents sport equally stylish crisp suits. The clothes become secondary to the gift unraveling- the toy car, doll, keyboard, all slowly collecting around her. Nadine was born in Montreal, Quebec, and these reels capture a short span of her life between the ages of 3 to 5 when the Valcin family relocated to the US. Her father passed in 1999, so the Valcin family was happy to revisit these memories of him.", Funding for Home Made Video project, including digitisation of footage, provided by Canada Council for the Arts' New Chapter program., Gift of Valcin family